MSU Tuition Increase

tuitionThe Board of Regents has voted to raise tuition 3 percent at Montana State University-Bozeman and the University of Missoula.  This increase will take effect next year on all university students.

MSU must cut $1 million from its budget compared to $2.5 million if tuition would have been frozen.  University officials seem happy they received their request to raise tuition, even though students and families are struggling to pay for college in these tough economic times.

An article in the Bozeman Daily Chronicle;

“We’ll see a shortfall still,” MSU President Geoff Gamble said Monday. “I think it’s OK.  It is really a recognition of where things are at.  These are tough financial times.”  It appears that Gamble cares about one thing, getting more and more money.  I don’t think this guy gets it.

The tuition hike will cost Montana in-state students $137 a year and out-of-state students about $600, Gamble said.  I bet all the students can’t wait for their tuition and fees to increase.  Only God knows what they plan next year for the increases.

MSU should reconsider Treasure State Network’s (TSN) Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request mentioned in my previous post.  It would help them to identify wasteful spending between the University and private contractors.  The University of Missoula and its affiliated universities responded to our request in a timely manner.

The university hides their contract information from TSN and has said that we need to schedule a time to come in and copy the information.  They also told us that we must pay for the labor for a staff member to pull the records and pay $.10 per page.  This is a stark contrast to the large majority of state agencies and universities who fully complied with our request and submitted a list of contracts or the actual contracts.

There must be an internal audit on the university so the citizens know how their existing money is being spent.  As a taxpayer, I would like to know where my money is going.  Also, MSU President Gamble makes $205,050 per year with benefits.

Like others he should to take a pay cut for the student’s sake.  This would help save the university a lot of headaches.

Gamble had mentioned about a $580,000 lost in state funds distributed to its sister campuses in Billings, Havre, and Great Falls where the Board of Regents kept the tuition freeze.  Then goes on to claim, “It’s at the lower end of what we were anticipating,” he said. “For an organization that’s already so thinly funded, every dollar is important.”

The university is already overfunded and it wastes ungodly amounts of money each year.  The students don’t benefit in the long run because the college continues to hike tuition to make up for these so called losses.

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3 Comments

  1. “The university is already overfunded and it wastes ungodly amounts of money each year. ”

    Is that just your opinion or is it a supportable conclusion? If it’s the latter, let’s see your proof.

  2. Funny, the Montana Reinvestment Act web site discusses tuition costs:

    ‘This Act makes a significant investment to hold down the cost of tuition for students so that attending one of our excellent two- or four-year colleges remains an affordable option for all Montanans. ‘

    http://recovery.mt.gov/highered/default.mcpx

    Thanks for your posts TSN and keep us informed on those FOI requests.

  3. […] tuition at Montana State University (MSU) and University of Montana (UM).   As mentioned in my previous post, both schools wanted this increase.   It would impact all college students and families […]


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